Brian Booth State Park – Amphibian Training Day!

It was a sunny day last Wednesday when our North Coast Steward and I took the NCC Silver 1 AmeriCorps team out for some training in wildlife surveys and marsh walking. Silver 1 is serving with Oregon State Parks on the central and north coasts for 10 weeks this winter. They are helping OPRD staff implement much needed restoration and research projects throughout our parks, focusing on the Beaver Creek State Natural Area. The team will survey areas of Beaver Marsh this late winter to count amphibian egg masses, which sounds pretty dull! But mincing around through a calm, cool marsh in highly stylish waders, surrounded by amazing birds, and looking through the water for egg mass treasures is a lot more fun than you might think!

Can you spot the red-legged frog egg mass

Can you spot the red-legged frog egg mass?

They will find egg masses and document some habitat features in the area, like water depth and vegetation. OPRD (me) will then be able to compare to last year, and do it again next year, and as the years go by we will have an idea about what the amphibian population is up to in the marsh. Amphibians are often one of the first groups of species to respond to changes in the ecosystem, which makes them excellent indicators of ecosystem health.

Sometimes the water levels drop after frogs lay their eggs. When this happens the egg masses can be left high and dry - winter and spring rains are good for amphibian breeding!

Sometimes the water levels drop after frogs lay their eggs. When this happens the egg masses can be left high and dry – winter and spring rains are good for amphibian breeding!

We can already see a difference from last year – it seems that spring came early! There were already a lot of egg masses in the marsh, when last year about this same time there were only a handful. For OPRD this is important information so that we can plan restoration projects during times of the year that will have the least negative impact on our natural resources, like breeding amphibians! For the Americorps team, who works on lots of trail building and community projects, this is a unique opportunity to experience a completely different set of work challenges. Maybe we’ll make a wildlife biologist out of one of them!

The team learns how to maneuver a marsh and not fall in.

The team learns how to maneuver a marsh and not fall in.

Posted on January 29, 2014, in Amphibians, Wildlife and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

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