Monthly Archives: April 2016

Plover Patrol Workshop

Do you spend a lot of time on the beach and want to know more about western snowy plovers? Join Oregon Parks and Recreation Department’s wildlife biologist Vanessa Blackstone for an in-depth workshop on the western snowy plover. Members of Coastwatch, SOLVE, and folks that just like walking the beach can all learn what to look to aid this tiny shorebird when out on our wild Oregon Coast. The first half of the workshop is all about the bird! The second half (after lunch) focuses on how to survey for plovers, and is required for OPRD’s Plover Patrol volunteers.

When: Sunday, April 24 10 am – 2pm
Where: Nehalem Meeting Hall, Nehalem Bay State Park

To register: contact Vanessa.Blackstone@oregon.gov

2016ShorebirdConservationAreas

There are 16 Snowy Plover Management Areas in Oregon

Topics Covered

First Half: A Tale of Plovers 10-noon:

  • Western snowy plover identification and life history
  • Threats and protection of the plover
  • Management history and what is happening now

Noon: Lunch break! Get to know your fellow plover lovers. Light refreshments provided.

Second Half: Surveying for Plovers 12:40 – 2 pm:

  • Survey Protocol
  • “Mock” survey to practice! Prizes for those that get it right!
  • Q and A on anything plover
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Plovers at Sitka Sedge!

Local residents at Sand Lake have been hearing about Sitka Sedge State Natural Area, the newest addition to OPRD’s parks focused on conserving amazing natural spaces for Oregonians to enjoy. Apparently western snowy plovers heard about it too, and they have set up some home sites!

Active Scrape (raven tracks)

Plover tracks around a nest scrape – the male makes many scrapes and the female picks one by laying her eggs in it! Photo courtesy Jeff Allen

This is the first documented nesting activity at Sitka Sedge since 1984 – a similar story to Nehalem Spit at Nehalem Bay State Park where last April plovers were found nesting there for the first time since 1984. I’m sure there is an interesting theory about that. Either way, they disappeared from our two north coast beaches the same year, and now they have returned one after the other!

Another interesting story is that BOTH pairs of plovers where discovered by volunteers on our Plover Patrol!

 

The beach at Sitka Sedge is one of 17 designated for western snowy plover recovery, and now that birds are in residence a Shorebird Conservation Area is in place. To help this these birds gain a foothold, vehicles (motorized and non-motorized, including bicycles), dogs, and kites are prohibited in the SCA from March 15-September 15. All other recreation must remain in the wet sand. These restrictions give the birds the best chance at raising a family – plovers are very sensitive to disturbance, and need that extra bit of space between us and their nests! You can help be a part of threatened species recovery by sharing the beach and letting plovers nest in peace.

SitkaSedgeSPMA2016