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North and Central Coast Plovers – Success in Three Places!

Not only did Nehalem Bay have the first western snowy plover chick  in over 50 years hatch and fledge this year, so did our newest park! Sitka Sedge State Natural Area, which will be open to the public in 2018, had three chicks hatch in late May.   Just recently, two of these little birds have been spotted 100 miles from their birthplace! Plover biologists banded the babies in order to keep track of them. In late July, teenage plovers were seen sporting these very bands on beaches near Florence. Now that they are big birds, they have spread their wings to explore the coast. These birds will likely return to their birthplace to breed next year, if they can make it through the winter.

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The birds have color bands on their legs – white and green on left and violet on the right. If you spy them please report it on eBird, or if you don’t have an eBird account you can contact OPRD directly. Photo by E. Kygsman, INR.

Plovers occasionally nest outside of plover management areas (plovers don’t read our maps, apparently). After reports of nesting plovers near Bayshore, Oregon State Parks beach rangers have been protecting each nest (with signs and ropes) as it is found. These buffers around the nests help people avoid stepping on the inconspicuous eggs and chicks.

Two of the nests at Driftwood have now hatched, and tiny chicks are out on the beach! Reports of these birds are now showing up on e-Bird. If you get the birding bug and want to go look for them, please be aware that the tiny chicks can be easily stepped on, and it’s very hard for them to escape. Give them some space while you enjoy this new experience!

Male and chick Driftwood RLowe (1)

Snowy plover dad and chick at Driftwood.

#sharethebeach

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Plover Chick at Nehalem!

Last week a historic event occurred at Nehalem Bay State Park. The first plover chick in over 30 years hatched on our beach!

Small, fragile, and fluffy. Like one of these guys

 

This is the third year snowy plovers have tried nesting at Nehalem since recovery efforts began at this site in 2012, and all previous nesting attempts failed. I had thought this nest – a two-egg scrape tended by two adults – was also lost last Thursday, when I found it empty and unkempt, with nothing but the tiniest shell fragment in the bowl. Worse, I found a dead chick a few feet from the nest with no indications of how it got there.

After I had packed up all my gear, I resumed searching for any signs of plovers. That’s when I found the funny tracks – two sets, adjacent, and with the distinct pattern of plovers. They were slightly different sizes, and I dared to hope that maybe one chicks survived.

These seemed to be different sizes. I was suspicious. And hopeful.

Friday morning I went back out to the beach just to see what I could find, and boy, I am glad I did! A lone male was sitting oddly on the sand. Literally on the sand – his belly was just barely touching the ground rather than fully pressed into the sand like a plover that is loafing (that’s a bird-specific scientific term for “relaxing”). He didn’t appear alarmed, either. As a biologist, all his behavior struck me as “hinky”. I set up my spotting scope at the high tide line about 75 feet away, far enough that he wasn’t making any movements that indicated he was upset that I was there.

Brooding male western snowy plover. He is just left of that upright stick in the center of the photo.

The longer I watched through the round lens of the scope the more suspicious I became. Then a crow flew overhead! The male ran, and out from under him tumbled the tiniest little fluff ball. The chick hunkered down and froze, blending into the sand immediately.

I watched through the screen on my phone as I held it precariously against the spotting scope lens.  This was some real “Wild America” playing out before my eyes.  The dad perched on a piece of driftwood, watching as the crow flew off. He bobbed his head, made a little chirp noise, and his chick came running and snuggled under his feathers. Now it was just a puffy daddy plover with two little chick legs sticking out from his breast.

Well, awesome! What now, wildlife biologist?

Well, I’ll tell you!

We aren’t done yet! Western snowy plover chicks are very small and fragile, about the size of your thumb when they first hatch. This little chick now faces a whole new set of challenges compared to when it was an egg, and it takes about a month for the chick to go from fluff ball to fully feathered and flying juvenile plover. During that time, many sorts of threats loom over it:

  • Trampling by beach visitors that don’t know it is there, by exuberant dogs gallivanting through the sand, by horses, even by deer and elk.
  • Predation from crows, coyotes, and gulls – any disturbance that makes the chick exposed to these predators could spell the end!
  • Separation from its dad, which increases chances a predator will notice it
  • Weather – the chick needs to stay with dad to keep it at the right temperature. He shades his chick when too hot, and cuddles it under his feathers when too cold.

How you can help – become a Plover Protector

Western snowy plovers are doing well because the public is helping them out – a plover protector is anyone that wants to see these birds back on Oregon beaches. Small actions you take can have huge impacts! To be a plover protector all you need to do is right here:

  • Abide by recreation restrictions in the designated plover areas . This means no dogs. Your pup may mean no harm but could easily squish a hiding chick. It also means no bicycles, kite-like objects, or other vehicles. These frighten the dad and his chick and can separate them.
  • Watch for chicks on the beach, and if you see any snowy plovers (in or out of the designated areas) give them a wide berth.
  • Watch your step! Plover chicks freeze and rely on camouflage to hide from danger. They also like to hide in small depressions,  like footprints, so forging your own path in the sand instead of staying in tracks left before you is better to avoid trampling chicks.
  • If you spot any snowy plovers, report them via e-Bird or e-mail me at vanessa.blackstone@oregon.gov with the location, date, number of plovers, any bands if you see them, and either a photo or the key marks that tell you they were western snowy plovers.

Happy Plover Day!

Today is Plover Day!

Starting today Oregonians share 16 beaches with this small shorebird for the spring and summer. The only shorebird that nests in the dunes of the Oregon Coast (apart from the wayward killdeer), western snowy plovers are a threatened bird that is making a come-back thanks to all the efforts of conservation groups, state and federal agencies, and most importantly, Oregonians.

Recreation restrictions at beaches managed for shorebirds go into effect today; watch for the yellow diamond signs to show you are entering a plover area. The birds make little nest scrapes in dry sand, and from here through July there could be camouflage eggs out there. For more on recreation restrictions, visit the official OPRD regulations page here.

If you want to know more about these amazing birds, join Oregon Parks and Recreation Department’s wildlife biologist Vanessa Blackstone for an in-depth workshop on the western snowy plover. Members of Coastwatch, SOLVE, and folks that just like walking the beach can all learn what to look to aid this tiny shorebird when out on our wild Oregon Coast. The first half of the workshop is all about the bird! The second half focuses on how to survey for plovers, and is required for OPRD’s Plover Patrol volunteers.

When: Saturday, March 18 9 am – 1pm
Where: Kiawanda Community Center, 34600 Cape Kiwanda Drive, Pacific City Oregon

 

WSP two-egg nest

Two western snowy plover eggs. Note there is no vegetation around them – plovers need open sand, and do not nest up in the beach grass.

 

 

Plover Patrol Workshop

Do you spend a lot of time on the beach and want to know more about western snowy plovers? Join Oregon Parks and Recreation Department’s wildlife biologist Vanessa Blackstone for an in-depth workshop on the western snowy plover. Members of Coastwatch, SOLVE, and folks that just like walking the beach can all learn what to look to aid this tiny shorebird when out on our wild Oregon Coast. The first half of the workshop is all about the bird! The second half (after lunch) focuses on how to survey for plovers, and is required for OPRD’s Plover Patrol volunteers.

When: Sunday, April 24 10 am – 2pm
Where: Nehalem Meeting Hall, Nehalem Bay State Park

To register: contact Vanessa.Blackstone@oregon.gov

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There are 16 Snowy Plover Management Areas in Oregon

Topics Covered

First Half: A Tale of Plovers 10-noon:

  • Western snowy plover identification and life history
  • Threats and protection of the plover
  • Management history and what is happening now

Noon: Lunch break! Get to know your fellow plover lovers. Light refreshments provided.

Second Half: Surveying for Plovers 12:40 – 2 pm:

  • Survey Protocol
  • “Mock” survey to practice! Prizes for those that get it right!
  • Q and A on anything plover

Plovers at Sitka Sedge!

Local residents at Sand Lake have been hearing about Sitka Sedge State Natural Area, the newest addition to OPRD’s parks focused on conserving amazing natural spaces for Oregonians to enjoy. Apparently western snowy plovers heard about it too, and they have set up some home sites!

Active Scrape (raven tracks)

Plover tracks around a nest scrape – the male makes many scrapes and the female picks one by laying her eggs in it! Photo courtesy Jeff Allen

This is the first documented nesting activity at Sitka Sedge since 1984 – a similar story to Nehalem Spit at Nehalem Bay State Park where last April plovers were found nesting there for the first time since 1984. I’m sure there is an interesting theory about that. Either way, they disappeared from our two north coast beaches the same year, and now they have returned one after the other!

Another interesting story is that BOTH pairs of plovers where discovered by volunteers on our Plover Patrol!

 

The beach at Sitka Sedge is one of 17 designated for western snowy plover recovery, and now that birds are in residence a Shorebird Conservation Area is in place. To help this these birds gain a foothold, vehicles (motorized and non-motorized, including bicycles), dogs, and kites are prohibited in the SCA from March 15-September 15. All other recreation must remain in the wet sand. These restrictions give the birds the best chance at raising a family – plovers are very sensitive to disturbance, and need that extra bit of space between us and their nests! You can help be a part of threatened species recovery by sharing the beach and letting plovers nest in peace.

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